Monday, 13 July 2020

Air display at Brisbane airport for new runway.

As mentioned in yesterdays post, Brisbane airport opened their new runway and after the aircraft departed for Cairns everyone at the airport was treated to an aerial display by a L-39 Albatross, a Mustang, a newly restored Spitfire and a Corp CA-16 MK 3.

But before the departure of the first aircraft on the new runway 01L I managed to get a few movements on the old runway 01R

ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE
DASSAULT FALCON 7X A56-002 (CN 284)

QANTAS B737-838 VH-XZL (CN 44573)
QF 712 OFF TO CAIRNS


QANTAS B737-838 VH-VYE (CN 33993)
QF 517 OFF TO SYDNEY

QANTAS A330-303 VH-QPI (CN 705) 

JETSTAR A320-232 VH-VPF (CN 5775) 
JQ 828 OFF TO TOWNSVILLE

VIRGIN AUSTRALIA B737-8FE VH-YFS (CN 41027)
VA9905 ARRIVING FROM GOLD COAST (FERRY FLIGHT)

L-39 ALBATROSS, P51 MUSTANG and a MK.XV1 SPITFIRE



AERO L-39C ALBATROS VH-UKR (CN 834424)

NORTH AMERICAN AVIATION P-51 MUSTANG VH-FST (CN 45-11256)

VICKERS SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE VH-XWE (CN TE-392)










COMMONWEALTH AIRCRAFT CORP CA-16 MK 3 VH-MFW (CN 693)







Sunday, 12 July 2020

Brisbane Airport opens new runway

On the 18th September 2007, the federal government granted approval for the construction of a new parallel runway here at Brisbane airport. The proposed $1.3 billion runway would take approximately eight years to construct and was to be built on swamp land west of the current terminal area and parallel to the existing main runway. On the 30th of July 2012 site preparation and reclamation works commenced. Well I am excited to say today Brisbane airports new runway, 01L / 19R which is 3,300 metres long (10,800 feet), was officially opened. Virgin Australia was the first airline to depart on the new runway taking off from the 01L end. Virgin Australia flight VA 781, a Boeing 737-8FE, VH-YFW pushed back at 10.50am and began taxiing at 10.58am.

VIRGIN AUSTRALIA B737-8FE VH-YFW (CN 41037)

















It took 8 minutes to taxi to the holding point of Runway 01L.
There were many dignitaries out on the field along with 10 lucky spotters chosen by computer after entering a competition.


ELITE HELICOPTERS AS.350BA VH-WMW (CN 2058)

AVIATION UTILITIES AS.350B3 VH-HTV (CN 3917)



























The aircraft sat there for approx. 10 minutes then was given clearance to take off.













As it taxied out for the runway it was given a famous water arch (water canon salute) by two of the local fire tenders. 


















To mark the anniversary of the very first flight between Brisbane and Tropical North Queensland by Barrier Reef Airways, which took off 73 years to the day (12th July 1947) it was only fitting that Virgin Australia got the honours. 

















After Virgin departed there was an air display by a Mustang, an L-39 Albatross and a newly restored Spitfire. 
Those photos will follow shortly.



Friday, 10 July 2020

Don't throw away your boarding pass..

Have you ever thrown away your airline boarding pass straight after your flight – or even just left it in the seat pocket on the plane – well there are plenty of reasons you should hold onto them until your journey is completely over.
For example, without a valid boarding pass to show, you might not be able to file any travel insurance claims after your trip or help locate your baggage if it doesn’t appear on the belt, and more.
Here are just some of the reasons you should keep your boarding passes safely stored until you return home, and when it’s okay to finally dispose of them.


1. You may need them for a travel insurance claim 
Even if your claim doesn’t relate to the flight itself, you may be asked to supply copies of your boarding passes and also airline tickets to either prove that you were travelling, or that you departed from Australia and returned home during the dates covered by your policy. It’s for this reason I always hold onto boarding cards until the end of my trip, whether tucked away in an envelope with the rest of my receipts, kept as a screenshot on my phone (in the case of web-based boarding passes), or stored safely in Apple Wallet if using mobile check-in.


2. Claiming missing frequent flyer points is tricky without them 
Most of the time, points arrive on their own – but when you do need to submit a missing points claim, you’ll often be asked to send through a copy of the boarding pass for the flight in question: particularly when travelling on a partner airline of your ‘home’ frequent flyer program. Some schemes take this one step further and even ask for your seat number during the claim process, which won’t often be shown on your airline ticket, but naturally does appear on your boarding pass.


3. Your barcode contains confidential booking information
Probably the most important reason of all, it’s best not to leave your boarding pass on the aircraft – or even snap a photo and share it on social media unredacted – as the barcode printed on the boarding pass can contain far more information than displayed in plain text. This can include your booking reference number or ‘PNR’, which provides online access to your itinerary and could be used for flight or seating changes, or to access personal information such as passport details, contact numbers, or potentially even frequent flyer accounts.


4. Your checked baggage receipts may be on the back

Safely arrived at your destination but your checked bag hasn’t?
When lodging your missing luggage report at an airline’s service desk, they’ll need to know which baggage tag they’re searching for: and your baggage stickers or receipts are often attached to the back of your boarding pass, or printed on the front alongside your other information.
In some cases – such as when flying with Qantas – your baggage receipt is printed on a card that otherwise looks like a boarding pass, which should again be kept together until all bags are returned.


5. Your boarding pass could unlock airport lounge access on arrival
After taking a domestic flight with Qantas or Virgin Australia, some travellers have the privilege of accessing an airport lounge at their destination before heading into the city, and the easiest way to do this is to flash the boarding pass from your inbound flight.

With Qantas, this is an option for Platinum, Platinum One and Chairman’s Lounge frequent flyers, along with business class passengers arriving into east coast cities on overnight flights from Perth.
Virgin Australia welcomes a broader list of passengers into the lounge after its flights, including all business class flyers, Velocity Gold and Platinum members, paid-up Virgin Australia Lounge members, and VIP-level members of The Club.

So, when should you dispose of your boarding pass?
As a rule, I hold onto my boarding passes from every trip until I’ve returned home, know that I won’t need to make a travel insurance claim from that journey, have confirmed that any frequent flyer points owed have been credited correctly, and have been reunited with any checked bags.
Assuming the boarding passes aren’t needed for anything else – as some companies may require them to support travel expense claims – only then are they disposed of, by going through the shredder.




https://www.executivetraveller.com/five-reasons-you-shouldn-t-bin-your-boarding-passes-while-travelling

Thursday, 9 July 2020

HiFly converts A380 from passenger to freighter

European wet-lease operator Hi Fly has brought into service a freight-optimised Airbus A380, which has been temporarily converted from passenger configuration in a project overseen by Lufthansa Technik. The German MRO and modification specialist was responsible for technical and engineering support, Hi Fly says of the project, while the work was executed by Hi Fly’s line maintenance provider Mesa at its Lisbon facility. The economy-class seats have been removed from the former Singapore Airlines widebody, which means the superjumbo can carry “close to 60 tonnes of cargo”, Hi Fly says. With the seats removed, pallets can be fitted to the seat tracks.


Source: Hi Fly


Source: Hi Fly


Source: Hi Fly


Source: Hi Fly


Source: Hi Fly


Source: Hi Fly


Source: Hi Fly


Source: Hi Fly

The aim is to tap “high [air freight] demand during the Covid-19 crisis”, the carrier states. Lufthansa Technik said in May that it had been awarded the technical and engineering task to support the “operational change” for the double-deck type, but did not name the customer. Hi Fly notes that the modification is temporary and complies with passenger-to-freight regulatory exemptions drawn up to meet demand during the coronavirus crisis. Lufthansa Technik says that it will also offer the conversion as a permanent solution. The project marks the emergence of A380s for freighter work some 13 years after a dedicated A380 freighter programme was effectively halted by a withdrawal of customer interest. With many operators of the A380 either removing the aircraft from their fleets or putting them into long-term storage, this year could see renewed interest in a freighter configuration of the type.


Source: Hi Fly

Of the A380’s potential in that regard, Henning Jochmann, Lufthansa Technik’s aircraft modification base maintenance senior director, told Flight Global in early June: “At the moment the oil price is very good, and there are logistical limitations, but I expect to see more A380s on the market.” Hi Fly’s A380 features the special “Save the Coral Reefs” livery that it unveiled at 2018’s Farnborough air show. The aircraft has since provided passenger services for airlines including Air Austral, Air Madagascar, Norwegian and the now-defunct Thomas Cook. The Hi Fly brand is operated by two airlines: one based in Portugal and the other in Malta.


Full story and photos sourced from here 
https://www.flightglobal.com/fleets/hi-fly-confirms-lht-oversaw-a380-freighter-conversion/139202.article